Immigrants experience many different forms of exclusion. Sometimes, the sources of exclusion are harsh and blatant, such as the discrimination and hatred that undocumented immigrants experience from being called “occupiers,” “criminals,” or “rapists.” At other times, these sources of exclusion are more subtle, such as when everybody agrees that immigrants should conform to the mainstream culture of the country of settlement at the expense of their own cultural and personal identities.

Imagine a new colleague in the position of an assistant professor (including research and teaching time) with the ambition to stay in academia. She was assigned quite some teaching tasks, which she wholeheartedly commits to. As she is not familiar with the curriculum, she needs to invest quite some time to give the teaching the quality that is expected, which she herself also finds very important. Therefore, all the time that she is paid for by her employer, she devotes to teaching.

Last July I had the opportunity to participate in the summer school Epistemologies of the South organized by the Center of Social Sciences of the University of Coimbra. During lectures and creative workshops, I met forty scholars, activists and artists from around the world in a dynamic and vibrant week of (self)learning.

The metropolitan community of City Heights, San Diego is home to 95,000 residents from 70 countries living within approximately 6.5 square miles. Within this complex landscape, non-profit, ethnic- and community-based organizations, and highly engaged residents dedicate their expertise, experience, and passion to the community.

In South Africa, on 23 March 2020, the government opted for a strict lockdown, a change that impacted each and every aspect of daily life, including those related to food consumption and preparation. Supermarkets were controlled, most informal markets were closed, certain goods became unavailable, and hygiene measures were strengthened. On top of this, family incomes were (and still are) at stake, especially for those relying on informal sources of income, as is common for many African migrants in South Africa.

LIMBO

Safe Enough To Be Brave

For the last issue (#62) of FOAM Magazine, Fabian Holle and Alaa Ammar co-wrote a paper...

Queer Poetry Night x LIMBO

Join us for an evening of queer stories and interactions during the Queer Poetry Night...

DEFIANCE DOLLS, with Sarah Naqvi

The tactility of objects, fabric, and hand stitching, have a universal language with a...

CLOWNING, with Mala Badi

Clowning: a workshop about clowning and the making of joy within the practice of...

FIMO CLAY - ancestral communication technology, with Jerrold Saija

In this workshop, I will give a short introduction what Ancestral communication...

BIOGRAPHICAL DRAWING, with Parisa Akbarzadehpoladi

Themes such as 'women's challenges, sexuality and new environments' being highlighted in...

POETRY, with Lamin Barrow

For this workshop, our focus would be on exploring the basics of building a poem....

STORY CREATION, with Rochita Loenen-Ruiz

Rochita's workshop practice is influenced by Adrienne Maree Brown, by Edouard Glissant’s...

THE ART OF RESTRAINT - rope play & consent, with Maha Youssef

In this workshop Maha will talk about, and practice together, with rope play, role play...